Menu

Cinnamon Flop – An Old Fashioned Breakfast Cake

Cinnamon FlopPart of me picked this recipe because the name Cinnamon Flop makes me giggle, another part of me picked it because who can turn down cake for breakfast, and the more mature part of me thought it would be an amazing addition to any Mother’s Day brunch. But seriously though, who can turn down cake for breakfast? It says it right there in the recipe that, “Served warm, it makes a delicious breakfast bread.” Bread might be stretching the truth a bit too far. It’s cake, let’s be honest.

Cinnamon Flop

Reasons for choosing it aside, the Cinnamon Flop was delicious! The crust was sugary and it had the perfect amount of cinnamon. The cake was moist and fluffy. My Mom would love it. Unfortunately she is half the Country away.

As with any old recipe there is a bit of trial and error involved, but that is why I am here: to make the errors for you so that your Cinnamon Flop is perfection! My oven is evil, and it does what it wants. Kind of like my cat but with worse consequences. As a result, the edges of my Cinnamon Flop (just can’t say it enough!) burned. Even the work of my overzealous oven couldn’t spoil the beautiful texture of the cake.

Cinnamon Flop

Cinnamon Flop

American Heritage Cookbook

Topping:

1 cup brown sugar, packed

4 tablespoons softened butter, unsalted

½ teaspoon cinnamon (I use Saigon, because in dishes like this, it makes a difference)

Dough:

2 cups sifted all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼ teaspoon salt

1 ½ cups sugar

2 tablespoons softened butter

1 egg, well beaten

1 cup milk (whole is better!)

 

Pre-heat oven to 425°. Grease 8-inch square baking dish.

Make topping first: Work brown sugar and butter together with your fingertips until well mixed. Then work in cinnamon. I over worked mine and when it was time to crumble the sugar mixture on top, mine wouldn’t crumble. Stop working the mixture a little before you see the perfect crumbs and add the cinnamon. Work as quickly as possible.

Cinnamon Flop

To make dough: Sift flour, baking powder and salt together and set aside. Mix sugar and butter with your fingertips until butter is well dispersed. It will look kind of like snow.

Cinnamon Flop

Stir in beaten egg thoroughly, then add flour and milk alternately, beginning and ending with flour. Pour into greased 8-inch square pan.

Cinnamon Flop Sprinkle the topping over the batter. Yours will be the perfect crumble. Promise.

 

Cinnamon Flop

Ugh. Not cute.

Bake in preheated oven for 25-35 minutes. Watch it carefully after 20. The old fail-safe bamboo skewer test doesn’t work perfectly because some of the topping will sink into the batter as it cooks and it will always stick to the skewer and look “un-done”. Just look for the wet white batter or crumbs. Serve warm. Yum.

Cinnamon FlopCinnamon Flop

27 Comments

  • Julia | JuliasAlbum.com
    May 10, 2013 at 3:02 pm

    Thank you for visiting my blog and for your kind words! The name Cinnamon flop makes me giggle too! This is exactly the kind of “bread” (read cake) that I love to have with my breakfast to accompany eggs and other proteins.

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      May 11, 2013 at 11:54 pm

      I’m not going to lie: I ate it with every meal for several days. Sigh.

      Reply
    • Jackiegene
      November 13, 2017 at 10:12 pm

      Easy,quick and oh so delightful. My kids both 27 ask for it often. Now a family favorite. Thank you so much!

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 11:22 pm

        Hooray! I am so glad its now a family favorite!

        Reply
    • Vanessa S King
      January 1, 2019 at 12:01 pm

      Would you be able to print the references for the “original” recipes?. I am a huge american heritage collector as well. I know that a lot of your wok has to do with fashioning a modern version out of an old style recipe/idea and I don’t want to detract from hard work. I was just wondering what decade or culture a lot of your recipes come from. I love the development history of the recipes as much as the recipes themselves. Even if your new recipe is really just “inspired” from another recipe you have seen in the past- it is all part of the creative process.

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        January 2, 2019 at 10:55 am

        Hi Vanessa! If I take the recipe from an old cookbook then I site which one. I have since deviated from my initial concept and mostly post my own modern recipes. A lot of my books are from the 30’s-60’s. Some of the older ones aren’t really suited to modern tastes.

        Reply
  • Christopher yorks
    January 30, 2014 at 6:53 pm

    So glad to have found this recipe. I remember this with fond memories from the 60’s Can’t wait to try it!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      January 30, 2014 at 7:55 pm

      Hi Chris! I’m so glad you found it too! It’s delicious!

      Reply
  • Christopher yorks
    January 31, 2014 at 4:51 am

    Oh my gosh! Greetings from HongKong! Just made this. Fabulous. Better than moms!!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      January 31, 2014 at 9:20 am

      Hi! I am so glad you loved it! I love when I discover a recipe in a heritage cookbook that isn’t as popular today but should be!

      ps- I lived in HK before the changeover. Went to HKIS. 🙂 Small world!

      Reply
  • Angela Rivera
    September 22, 2014 at 10:23 pm

    Thanks so much browsing for cinnamon recipe it’ looks like a winner will be making it for brunch.

    Reply
  • Mike S
    February 14, 2016 at 8:31 am

    I solved the non-crumbly topping problem by using a utensil to mix and break it up while doing some manual mixing. I think it’s hand warmth melting the butter that makes it get smeary.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 14, 2016 at 11:43 am

      I think you are absolutely right, Mike! Well done! We could also use a pastry blender like pie crust too 🙂

      Reply
  • emily
    August 13, 2016 at 8:12 am

    made this last night for breakfast this morning… your’s looks tastier than mine BUT it was very yummy and perfect with a cup of coffee!!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      August 18, 2016 at 12:50 pm

      Hooray! I’m so glad you liked it Emily! I am sure yours was just as pretty as mine. Isn’t it delightful with coffee!

      Reply
  • Jackie jean
    March 25, 2017 at 11:50 pm

    Love this cake. My son in law just made some tonight. Big hit at our house. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  • Jackie jean
    March 25, 2017 at 11:52 pm

    Love this cake. My son in law just made some tonight. Big hit at our house. Thank you so much.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 9, 2017 at 2:53 pm

      I’m so glad! It’s just such a classic!

      Reply
      • Beverly
        August 11, 2017 at 4:53 pm

        I grew up eating this cake in my grandmother’s kitchen and have her ingredient stained recipe card. But I must say, you are making this recipe much harder than it needs to be. Also your 425 temp oven is way too hot, no wonder it burned.

        1 cup flour
        1 tsp. baking powder
        dash salt
        1/2 cup sugar
        2 Tbls. soft butter
        1 egg
        1/2 cup milk
        Mix all at once, Can even be stirred in a bowl with wooden spoon.
        Put into 8 ” square or round ( she always did round)
        Topping: First sprinkle about 3/4 cup brown sugar over top. Dot with 2-3 Tbls. butter , NOT melted. Sprinkle a generous tsp. cinnamon over top. Bake 350 degrees about 25 minutes.
        This recipe is for one cake.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          August 17, 2017 at 12:59 pm

          Hi Beverly! The recipe is from the American Womans Cookbook (I believe my edition is the 1940 edition). I agree that the 425 is way too hot! I’d bake it at 350 but I think the creaming method is fine. I think instead of using your fingers you could use the paddle attachment on a stand mixer or a hand mixer but I stand behind alternately adding the milk with the dry. It is easier not to overmix your batter when you use this method. Thank you for your grandmother’s recipe! I will absolutely try it! Happy baking!

          Reply
          • Jess Mc
            December 22, 2017 at 11:36 am

            I love it when bloggers have gracious responses to others! Thank you for your example.

          • Lindsey
            December 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

            🙂

        • Linda Wolf
          September 28, 2019 at 8:29 pm

          Hi there!

          Just responding to Beverly- this was my Grandma”s recipe as well. Just delicious!

          Linda

          Reply
  • Lee Hughes
    February 10, 2019 at 11:43 am

    I just made this for breakfast this morning…several problems. The 425 is WAY too hot. The baking time is questionable, even at the higher temperature. At 25 minutes, my cake was still liquid in the middle! I lowered the temperature, and continued to bake. It wasn’t “done” until almost 50 minutes! (Actually, 48 minutes)It is now cemented to the bottom of the baking dish.
    I was able to finally get a piece out. It has good flavor, but I will be making several alterations the next time I make it: 375 rather than 425, lining the dish with parchment in addition to greasing, adding about 2 tablespoons of flour to the topping, and allowing 40-50 minutes for baking.

    Reply
  • […] Cinnamon Flop – An Old Fashioned Breakfast Cake from American Heritage Cooking […]

    Reply
  • […] Medal Flour Old Fashioned Cinnamon Sugar Cake Donuts from The Busy Baker Cinnamon Flop – An Old Fashioned Breakfast Cake from American  Heritage Cooking Fried Mush from Tastes of Lizzy […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.