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Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like the kind you get at the donut shop! 

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

And they weren’t that difficult! They are easier to mix than cake. They spend a little time in the refrigerator and then you cut them out like cookies. Then they hang out a little longer in the refrigerator. Then in under 2 minutes, you have perfect old-fashioned donuts! It’s kind of dangerous now that I know that they are this easy.

I smell trouble.

Oh no…that’s just fryer oil heating up…

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

Some people have a fear of flying, but I have a fear of frying.

Which, when you think about it, is a way more rational fear. Mkay? [This is where you smile and nod.]

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

Until culinary school I had never fried anything.

In culinary school I managed to fry only 3 things: beignets, churros, and brioche donuts. All on the same day; all to varying degrees of doneness. Lovely.

At work the guys on the line found watching me fry stuff so comical that I seriously considered selling tickets to the show. The first time I fried Brussels sprout leaves I damn near fainted. And you could probably hear their laughter in the dining room.

 

So these old-fashioned donuts are a big deal.

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

I’m kind of “meh” on yeast-raised donuts. I don’t get it. I probably never will.
But cake donuts fill my soul and stomach with happiness.

There is only one kind of cake donut that will do. It’s not baked; it’s fried. Legit fried.

Because do you know what a baked donut is? It’s CAKE, people! Cake in a donut shape. And there ain’t nothin’ special about that.

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

Chez Catey Lou Donut Shower GraphicSo when Allie (from Baking a Moment) and Zainab (from Blahnik Baker) proposed donuts as the theme for Catey’s virtual baby shower, I knew what I had to do…Perfect Old-fashioned sour cream cake donuts.

I will face my fear of frying because nothing short of perfect will do for Catey’s perfect baby girl.
These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

I first met Catey, from Chez CateyLou, several months after I moved to NYC last year. Catey and I hit it off immediately. Sometimes in life you meet someone who is so similar to you that it feels like you have known each other for years. That is how I felt when I met Catey.

When she told me over a delicious dinner of Greek food that she was pregnant, I couldn’t have been more elated! She is a genuinely beautiful person inside and out and I cannot wait to meet her gorgeous baby girl. Catey, I am so happy for you!

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

So happy I fried. Too much? Sorry.

Make sure you check out all the other amazing donuts that were made in Catey’s honor.

Baked Dark Chocolate Strawberry Donuts – Club Narwhal
Baked Lemon Donuts – What Jessica Baked Next
Biscoff Donuts – Baking a Moment
Chai Donuts – Fresh April FloursChocolate Cake S’mores Donuts – Jessica in the Kitchen
Chocolate Pretzel Donuts – The Emotional Baker
Coconut Matcha Donuts with White Chocolate Glaze – Blahnik Baker
Coffee and Donuts Breakfast Bake – The Cookie Rookie
Doughnut Tiramisu – bethcakes
GF Lemon Donuts with Raspberry Glaze – Thoroughly Nourished Life
Maple Glazed Donut Holes – Hall Nesting
Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts – American Heritage Cooking
Paleo Chocolate Frosted Donuts – A Clean Bake
Raspberry Jam Filled Cupcakes – gotta get baked
Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Donut Breakfast Sandwich – Shared Appetite
Strawberry Margarita Oreo Donuts – Life Made Sweeter
Baked Mini Samoa Donuts – Culinary Couture
Donut Holes with Sweet Strawberry Dipping Sauce – Twin Stripe

 

Some keys to donut success:

  1. Keep the dough cold. Roll and cut it quickly to keep the baking powder from starting to react with the sour cream. Double acting baking powder will react again when fried, but let’s save all the expansion power for later, shall we.
  2. Use canola oil or some other neutral tasting oil that has a high smoke point.
  3. Monitor your oil temperature. 340° F is too cold – I don’t care what ChefSteps says; it’s too damn cold. Your donuts will be greasy. 380° F is too damn hot. The outside will be dark and awful while the inside is still gooey. Umm gross. 350°-360° F is your target range. Adjust your heat as it approaches the boundaries. Don’t be afraid to turn off the stove. This is the great thing about frying. If the oil temperature isn’t where you want it, just wait. So liberating.
  4. Do be careful. The oil looks so happy and peaceful in there, but I can assure you that 350° F oil is VERY hot. I have the scars from work to prove it. Carefully use the slotted spoon to place the donut in the oil and to remove it. I gently drop it in the oil with my hand so that it slips inside, but I have been trained to have no fear. And the burns to prove it….
  5. May I remind you that oil and water do not mix. When water gets into hot oil, it splatters violently. If this happens, back away. Quickly. This is easily avoidable if you dry all your utensils after rinsing them off. If there is any water collected on the top of your dough, which there shouldn’t be if you properly wrapped them, then blot it off before putting it in the oil.
  6. Place your fried donuts on a wire rack over a baking sheet or towels to catch the extra oil. This will keep the bottoms crispy. There will be no soggy bottoms on our donuts!
  7. Dip the donuts in the glaze while they are still warm so you don’t need to heat up your glaze. People say to use chopsticks. Come on. Isn’t life hard enough? Just use your fingers. It’ll toughen them up. It’s good for you. My Dad taught me that.

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts are UNREAL. Unreal. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like you get at the donut shop!

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts

Total Time: 2 hours

Yield: 12 donuts; 20 donut holes

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts

These Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts perfect. The inside is soft, tender and cakey; and the outside is crispy with a classic sweet glaze. Just like the ones you get from the donut shop!

Ingredients

    For the Donuts:
  • 240 g Granulated sugar (1 ¼ cups)
  • 36 g butter ( 2.5 tablespoons)
  • 90 g egg yolks (about 5 large yolks)
  • 380 g sour cream (1 ½ cups)
  • 600 g pastry flour, All-Purpose flour is fine ( 4 ¾ cups)
  • 15 g baking powder (1 tablespoon + ¾ teaspoon)
  • 12 g kosher salt (1 tablespoon)
  • 96 fl oz Oil for frying (I used canola)
  • For the Glaze:
  • 100 g whole milk (100ML)
  • 4 g kosher salt (1 teaspoon)
  • 400 g powdered sugar (3 ¼ cups)

Instructions

    To Make the Donut Dough:
  1. In a large bowl sift together the pastry flour and baking powder. Whisk in the salt to distribute. Set aside.
  2. Line a large mixing bowl with plastic wrap and then spray the surface of the plastic wrap. Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together the granulated sugar, butter, and yolks on high speed until the mixture lightens and the volume increases, about 2 minutes.
  4. Stop the mixer and add the sour cream, then mix on medium until the mixture is smooth and homogenous.
  5. With the stand mixer on low, gradually add the dry ingredients to the bowl a large spoonful at a time. Add the next spoonful when you only see a few large streaks of flour left in the bowl. Stop the mixer when the dry ingredients are fully incorporated. You want to do this as quickly as possible so that not too much gluten develops, which will make tunnels in your cake and it will be tough.
  6. Transfer the dough to the plastic wrap lined bowl, spray the top of the dough with nonstick spray and then fold the edges of the plastic over the top to cover.
  7. Refrigerate for 60 minutes. At this point the dough can be held in the fridge for up to 1 week.
  8. To Cut & Fry:
  9. Line a baking half-sheet pan with parchment paper and spray the paper with nonstick spray and set aside.
  10. Lightly dust a work surface with flour. While the dough is still in the bowl dust the top of the dough with flour. Turn the dough out onto your floured work surface, floured side down. Lightly dust the top with more flour.
  11. Working quickly to keep the dough cool, roll out the dough to ½ inch thick.
  12. Brush any excess flour from the top of the dough. Use a 3-inch and 1 ¼ - inch ring cutters to cut the donuts and holes. Lightly tap the rings in flour before cutting each donut. Place the donuts and donut holes on the prepared sheet pan. [After I cut all my donuts, I went back and cut more “holes” with the small cutter from the scraps of dough. Waste not, want not!]
  13. Cover sheet pan with plastic wrap, but be sure not to let the plastic touch the top of the donuts. Chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. I let mine chill overnight at this step.
  14. While your donuts chill, make the glaze. In a medium bowl whisk together the milk, powdered sugar and salt. Cover the glaze with plastic wrap directly on the surface. You can heat up the glaze over a pot of simmering water on the stove if you want it thinner. I dipped my donuts while they were still very hot, so I didn’t need to do this.
  15. Pour oil into a fryer or a Dutch oven, making sure the oil is at least 2 inches deep. Heat your oil to 350° F. Adjust your heat to keep the temperature between 350° - 360° F while frying. You will need a clip-on fry/candy thermometer for this. I heat my oil up to 360° F before adding a batch of donuts because the cold dough will lower the temperature of the fryer oil.
  16. Gently place 3 donuts in the fryer, keep the remaining donuts in the fridge. Once they rise to the surface, cook for 30 seconds and then flip them with a slotted spoon. Fry until the bottom develops a nice golden brown color, about 80 seconds. Flip it again and then fry for another 80 seconds or until the color is a nice even golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack set over a sheet pan or paper towels. Donut holes fry for 30 seconds then flip, then another 60 seconds, then flip, then another 40-60 seconds. They will puff up and be golden brown all over. You can cook them for the same amount of time as the full donuts but they will be a little dry. [Before I fried all of my donuts, I tested one and broke it open to make sure it was cooked. ]
  17. Once the donut is just barely cool enough to handle (I only waited about 20 seconds but I have no feeling left in my fingertips…), dip the donut in the glaze and place back on the wire rack. Dipping a hot donut will give you a nice, even glaze that isn’t too thick or too thin!
  18. Store in an airtight container overnight but they are best consumed the day they are fried…with coffee.

Notes:

Recipe for both donuts and glaze from ChefSteps

https://www.cheflindseyfarr.com/2016/02/old-fashioned-sour-cream-cake-donuts/

Did you make this recipe? I want to hear all about it! 🥳Tag me on Instagram @cheflindseyfarr and use the hashtag #americanheritagecooking

151 Comments

  • Nikki
    February 22, 2016 at 5:47 pm

    I’m with you on a “baked” donut..it’s a cake!
    Now if we can get rid of the other “bastardization” of a pastry the “CRONUT” I’t not a donut..it’s not a croissant. And why fry a laminated dough that has been painstakingly rolled, folded, rolled and folded multitude of times to get a nice buttery layers..? The result is not light buttery airy layers but greasy heavy layers…. OK I’m done and will get down off my soapbox.
    By the way is it dounut..or doughnut?
    I feel so much better getting all that off my chest thanks for letting me vent….
    In any case thanks for a real recipe for a real old fashioned donut.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 1:02 am

      LOL! I am WITH you on the cronut! And I never know how to spell donut…I just picked one and stuck with it! haha

      Reply
      • Candice
        April 19, 2020 at 2:14 pm

        Sorry if I missed this in any other comments (did try to check first), but do you think egg substitute is going to royally mess with me? Because of quarantine, my area is low on eggs and I don’t have 5 eggs to spare but I have plenty of egg substitute.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          April 20, 2020 at 9:57 am

          Hi Candice, I am not familiar with egg substitute. You could certainly try it but I would stick to the weight of yolk + eggs in the recipe and substitute 1:1. You just don’t want your dough to be too sticky or so liquid it is more like a batter. Good luck!

          Reply
  • Joy
    February 22, 2016 at 5:51 pm

    I just love the pictures and was going to use the recipe. But without the complete recipes in tsp., Tbsp., cups etc. I do not want to receive any more recipes until you can fix the poblem

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 1:01 am

      Joy, the ingredients are also listed in cups, teaspoons, etc. in parenthesis right next to the ingredient. I know because it took me over an hour to do it.

      Reply
      • Jeanne Marie
        February 18, 2020 at 9:14 pm

        Why don’t ppl read before they comment…love the read and sound of this recipe and can’t wait to try it! Will also be sending this to my daughter who loves plain cake donuts as well as I do.🥃🥓

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          March 2, 2020 at 3:04 pm

          Haha! Cheers to that Jeanne Marie! Happy frying to you and your daughter as well!

          Reply
    • Helen Taylor
      June 2, 2016 at 4:20 pm

      The sour cream donut looks wonderful. But I need the recipe in tsp.,cups, etc.

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        June 4, 2016 at 11:47 am

        Hi Helen, the measurements in tsp, cups, etc are in parenthesis next to the weight ingredients. Happy baking!

        Reply
        • Emma
          March 4, 2018 at 8:48 pm

          Wow! I’m sorry, but there are just too many people who want to be spoon fed in life! It’s very clearly showing both types of measurements! OMG! How much more plain can you be?

          I have been in chemistry after chemistry after chemistry / (certified pharmacy tech, as well), so I already know how to change from metric to American measures and back again. It wouldn’t have been that big of a deal if you hadn’t already done it. But really people? The internet is FULL….OVERLOADED even, with conversion websites that all you have to do is plug in a number and choose from the type of measure, and the equivalent in the other measure is right before your eyes, like MAGIC! Wow!

          Reply
          • Emma
            March 4, 2018 at 8:52 pm

            meant to say…you don’t need to post my message. I don’t even expect you to. But I wanted you to know I feel for you that you worked so hard to do this for people and they can’t even open their eyes and SEE. Sometimes it makes me crazy to see how spoiled people act.

            LOL Thanks for the recipe though. I’m really anxious to try it. I’ve been craving one of these for a while.
            And I guess I need to be more afraid of things. I’ve never been afraid of cooking with gas. It’s much better than electricity. And I do have a tinge of nervousness about hot oil…but not to the extent that I wouldn’t do it!

          • Lindsey
            March 20, 2018 at 2:09 pm

            Haha! Thank you for your comment and empathy! Sometimes I do get frustrated because my content is free, so a little extra work isn’t the end of the world!

            I really hope you do try it! I make large batches of these (and others that I have since created) at the restaurant and they are a HUGE success! You can do it!

  • Lynn @ Fresh April Flours
    February 22, 2016 at 6:39 pm

    “So happy I fried,” hahahaha. Love it. These donuts look soooo good, and so authentic! You are a donut master, Lindsey!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 12:59 am

      Thanks, Lynn! And I’m so glad that someone else appreciate that awful joke, but it cracked me up! lol

      Reply
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  • Medha @ Whisk & Shout
    February 22, 2016 at 8:31 pm

    I too have a fear of frying- so much hot oil just waiting to splatter everywhere and sit in my clothes for hours later! But I also firmly believe donuts are best when fried, and these glazed beauties look SO worth it 🙂

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 12:58 am

      Hot oil is the scariest! Plus I always feel so guilty eating fried foods! But they are soooo worth it!

      Reply
  • Dorothy @ Crazy for Crust
    February 22, 2016 at 10:17 pm

    These are SERIOUS perfection. OMG. I need one, I was just craving donuts today!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 12:57 am

      Thanks Dorothy!! The question is when am I not craving donuts!

      Reply
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  • Cate | Chez CateyLou
    February 23, 2016 at 8:45 am

    I really wish this shower wasn’t a surprise so I could have come over and eaten these!! I have never seen a more beautiful donut – seriously! I have such a fear of frying too…you are inspiring me to try it! Thank you so much for celebrating my baby girl. Lindsey!! I am so lucky to have met such awesome friends like you through blogging. xoxo

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 23, 2016 at 1:00 pm

      That’s funny because I said the exact same thing to Zainab and Allie! I fully intend to make a chocolate variety, which I will happily bring you! I feel so lucky to have met you! I am so excited for you and I can’t wait to meet your new baby girl! xoxoxo

      Reply
  • Amy @ Thoroughly Nourished Life
    February 23, 2016 at 6:58 pm

    Oh I get you on the fear of frying! I made fried doughnuts a few weeks ago for the fiance and he loved them, but I was in a cold sweat the whole time! I love the look of these doughnuts so much though I’m willing to face the oil again. Since there’s no yeast they should be easy to make GF (I can’t get yeast and GF to work for me yet!) and then I can feast on their amazingness!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 25, 2016 at 11:07 am

      Haha! You should definitely face the oil again – these little guys are totally worth it! I know I will be soon. Good luck with the GF!

      Reply
  • Kelly
    February 23, 2016 at 7:37 pm

    These look out of this world, Lindsey! ! Fried donuts all the way especially if they are sour cream! Yay for facing your fear! Haha so happy you fried for Cate too 🙂

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 25, 2016 at 11:06 am

      I couldn’t agree more Kelly!!!

      Reply
  • Zainab
    February 23, 2016 at 8:32 pm

    Old fashioned is the way to go for sure! these are anazing! And thank you for being a part of the shower.

    Reply
  • Chris @ Shared Appetite
    February 23, 2016 at 10:45 pm

    1) Frying is way more scary than flying
    2) Where can one purchase these tickets to see you frying at work?
    3) Do your colleagues laugh at you frequently? If so, I want to be their friends.
    4) When are we getting ramen?
    5) Seriously, it’s time for you to grow up and get ramen
    6) Bring these donuts with you
    7) I’m with ya on the cake vs. yeast thing. Cake for the win.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 25, 2016 at 11:05 am

      LOL! You leave the best comments -hands down.
      1) Totally. I knew we would agree.
      2) Oh heck no! I would like to contain my embarrassment to as few people as possible 🙂
      3) Their favorite pastime is laughing at me. And making fun of me in Spanish, which I am learning, much to their added enjoyment. You guys would get along swimmingly.
      4) Get yo tush to the City!
      5) I was thinking about this just last week. Seriously, though, get yo butt to the city!
      6) Maybe. If you’re lucky.
      7) Cake – always and forever

      Reply
  • Meriem @ Culinary Couture
    February 24, 2016 at 1:03 am

    I think I’m ready to conquer my fear of frying! These look phenomenal!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 25, 2016 at 11:01 am

      Do it, Meriem!!!

      Reply
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  • Shashi at RunninSrilankan
    February 24, 2016 at 2:37 pm

    Haha – I have a fear of frying too – but I am with Chris @ Shared appetite – am coming to NYC for a long stay in July and I want tickets to this fry-show you speak of!
    BTW this Sunday, I woke up early and we went to Krispy Kreme to get a couple of sour cream cake donuts- guess we should have just started driving north instead of krispy kreme eh?!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 25, 2016 at 11:01 am

      LOL! I’m afraid the show is a private event! But I hope I get to see you when you come to NYC in July!

      You totally should have just kept driving! I didn’t know KK had cake donuts?! Thank god, or I would be really fat.

      Reply
  • Laura @ Laura's Culinary Adventures
    February 25, 2016 at 8:22 pm

    Oh my goodness! These are so decadent! I have a fear of frying too 🙂

    Reply
  • Megan - The Emotional Baker
    February 26, 2016 at 7:08 am

    I’m scared to fry, too! But I have to get over it so I can try these – they look phenomenal 🙂

    Reply
  • Nancy @ gottagetbaked
    February 26, 2016 at 6:33 pm

    You’re my culinary hero for getting over your fear of frying. Me, I’m still in the clutches of my heated-oil-phobia. Your cake donuts look just as good, if not better, than the ones sold in the store. I’m in total awe of how gorgeous these are!

    Reply
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  • Kayle (The Cooking Actress)
    March 7, 2016 at 7:11 pm

    lol I have a fear of frying too! But sometimes, for the sake of deliciousness, you have to face your fears 😛 And I’m so glad you did for these donuts, they def look worth it!

    Reply
  • Mary Frances
    March 8, 2016 at 4:22 pm

    I’m not too fond of donuts but these cronuts look so good!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 9, 2016 at 11:27 am

      I have never met anyone who isn’t too fond of donuts! I love cake donuts!

      Reply
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  • Laura @ Laura's Culinary Adventures
    March 24, 2016 at 8:02 am

    These are better than anything you could get at a bakeshop! I have fear of frying too 🙂

    Reply
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  • Ted McNemar
    March 26, 2017 at 12:09 pm

    Lindsey, I loved you whole post. Your sense of humor is great. I don’t understand why people couldn’t see the standard measures right in front of their nose. However, if anyone is going to seriously bake ( and to even though their fried donuts are still considered baked goods,) they need to learn that pastry/baking is not about recipes but about formulas. The sooner you learn how to measure all of your ingredients by weight in grams the more successful your baking attempts will be. It also makes doubling or even “halving” a recipe so much easier! Keep up the great work!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 9, 2017 at 2:53 pm

      Thanks for understanding Ted! Thank you so much for your comment, it made my day! Happy baking (and frying)!

      Reply
  • Maria
    April 5, 2017 at 10:28 am

    Hi, this is my first time cooking these. Going to have to practice it. Love them.

    Thank you
    Maria

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 9, 2017 at 11:47 am

      Hi Maria! Just remember to treat the dough with love and they will turn out fantastic. Promise 🙂 Happy frying!

      Reply
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  • Taylor Duckham
    July 19, 2017 at 11:05 pm

    Why is my dough so sticky? No matter what I did was super sticky.. Still in process of making it and trying again right now but still super sticky please help!!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      July 20, 2017 at 12:10 pm

      Use more bench flour! It takes a lot! Also remember dough sticks to dough, so if there is dough on your hands or the counter then it will stick even more. Try not to work the flour into the dough, just use it on the surface and then brush off the excess. Happy frying!

      Reply
      • Bill
        March 12, 2018 at 10:06 am

        How much is “more” bench flour? When I create this “dough” (even when I was using the Chefsteps recipe) the dough acted more like cake batter than “dough”.

        I’ve done this recipe 3 times… all with the same result.

        I don’t know if this is because I’m in Florida and the humidity is relatively high (pun intended).

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          March 20, 2018 at 2:02 pm

          Hi Bill, It is absolutely essential that you chill the dough. It is like a very thick cake batter. I make large batches at the restaurant and I pull out a large piece of plastic wrap, cover it in flour (like enough to coat the plastic), scoop out the dough with a bowl scraper onto the floured plastic, cover the top in flour, wrap it, press it flatter, then chill it until firm. It isn’t a sexy process and the dough gets on anything it touches that isn’t floured, but I promise you it works. You just have to power through it! I wouldn’t worry about using too much flour as long as you brush off excess after you cut it. The excess flour will dirty your fryer oil faster and it will affect the taste of the donuts eventually. Good luck! ps- humidity has everything to do with baking! I think generous flouring will do the trick!

          Reply
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  • Kate
    July 30, 2017 at 12:46 pm

    I made these gluten free with namaste all purpose flour. I made them into bars and they turned out pretty ok. The texture was a bit dense and they didn’t split until I used a knife to add a split on top. In the future, because they were good enough to make again, I will decrease the flour for a “wetter” dough. Also, I think this recipe counts on simple flavors, but gf flours do not bring much flavor to the party. I will add a bit a fresh nutmeg to add more dimension to the taste. I took a picture but I don’t know how to share it.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      August 3, 2017 at 10:33 pm

      Wow props to you, Kate, for making donuts gluten free! I’ve heard Bob’s Red Mill makes a great gluten free AP flour, you could also try switching up your brands. I’m not sure what you mean by “bars” but if you mean you made them square instead of round that is fine but the reason the hole exists in cake donuts is because it gets heat on the inside and outside otherwise it is likely they would burn before the centers were cooked. Thanks for sharing!

      Reply
  • Krock
    August 1, 2017 at 11:45 pm

    Hey, I just made this recipe and followed it EXACTLY. However, the doughnuts came out very chewy and weren’t the dense old fashioned doughnuts I’m used to. Is this normal? I don’t live in a place with high humidity, and its not high altitude. I’m not sure what happened. They look exactly the same as yours, but the texture is Soooo chewy. They’re also cooked completely through.. I’m not really sure what the issue is. Or if that’s just how this recipe turns out? I’ve always had old fashioned doughnuts that were dense and kind of crumbly.. But in a delightful way lol on the plus side, my 13 year sister loves them! 🙂

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      August 3, 2017 at 10:30 pm

      Hi! They definitely aren’t supposed to be chewy. They are like fried cake. Generally when baked goods come out chewy it is due to the handling of the dough. Once you start to add the wet ingredients and hydrate the gluten, you want to mix as minimally as possible. Also having the appropriate rest times and working with the dough chilled is very important! You might also want to check the date you opened your baking powder because it becomes less active over time. Also check the protein in your flour because if you used a flour that is higher in protein, it will be chewier. Try again! Happy frying!

      Reply
  • Krock
    August 4, 2017 at 11:34 pm

    Nope, I followed the recipe 100% the same. The baking powder was new. I used Gold star flour, but you had said that it was fine to use all purpose flour. The dough was made exactly as you said, and I kept it in the fridge until I put them into the oil. Everything was exactly as your recipe called for. Followed it to the T. They just came out incredibly chewy and gross. Not sure exactly what went wrong. Maybe I’ll try again with actual cake flour.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      August 17, 2017 at 1:04 pm

      Hi Krock. I wouldn’t use cake flour because you won’t get enough gluten and I worry they won’t hold together. I’ve made this recipe dozens of times and on a large scale for the restaurant, so I know it works. I use pastry flour at home but I use high quality AP Flour at the restaurant and it still makes a very tender cake. If you say you followed the recipe to a T, then I’m not sure what else to suggest. Have a lovely week!

      Reply
  • Eric
    October 16, 2017 at 4:13 pm

    Thank you posting this recipe, as these are my favorite donuts ever! I recently tried to make these for the first time and they didn’t come out properly and decided to try again. I made them exactly as stated in your recipe and even did weight instead of measurements (I recently learned that is the only way to bake). But, both time I’ve tried this the dough is very sticky after mixing all of the ingredients. I am able to get it out of the mixing bowl, but with a slight mess. Should the dough come out of the mixer easily in a ball form or more doughy and sticky? Also, I have a kitchen-aid stand up mixer and am using the paddle attachment to mix everything. Is that correct? I will look forward to hearing from you and hopefully I will figure this out soon so I can enjoy these delicious donuts.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:45 pm

      Hi Eric, I don’t think you are doing anything wrong. You definitely want to use the paddle attachment in a kitchenaid stand mixer. The dough is definitely sticky. It will stay together better once it is properly chilled but you need a GENEROUS amount of flour. When I make these in large batches at work I put them on floured plastic wrap, then flour the top, then wrap and chill the dough. Keep trying!!!

      Reply
  • […] Raspberry Glaze – Thoroughly Nourished Life Maple Glazed Donut Holes – Hall Nesting Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts – American Heritage Cooking Paleo Chocolate Frosted Donuts – A Clean Bake Raspberry Jam Filled Cupcakes – gotta get […]

    Reply
  • Emily
    November 5, 2017 at 9:16 am

    Just made these for the first time! They’re so good! Definitely a do again recipe. Surprisingly, at only 16 years old, I’m not afraid of the frying oil! Guess I have that more irrational fear of flying! XD

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:28 pm

      Well that is the blessing of youth, Emily! lol! No fear.
      I am so glad you enjoyed them! You should try the chocolate ones!

      Reply
  • Summer L.
    November 7, 2017 at 6:20 am

    Hi, Lindsey! I made these over the weekend…twice. The first time I made them, I liked them, but I knew something wasn’t quite right. Then I figured out I hadn’t rolled them out thick enough and so they cooked too long and were a little bit dry and too brown. So the next day I set out to do them again. I also cut the salt in half only because I wanted them a bit sweeter (for my taste) and I added a little vanilla to the glaze, plus made a little extra glaze. I rolled them out to the right thickness and instead of strictly keeping to the frying times I eyeballed it and took them out when they were golden brown, like you said. I double-dipped in the glaze (once after 30 seconds or so after being on the rack and again after another minute). On about 1/3 of them, I dipped in the glaze once and sprinkled generously with cinnamon & sugar. This batch was absolutely perfect and so delicious! I knew the first batch was over cooked. But now that I know what to do, I’ll make these for company. They’re so good! And you’d be proud. I dipped with my fingers. 🙂

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:32 pm

      Look at you Summer!!! Donuts two days in a row! I am super proud that you dipped with your fingers! Next time you should try substituting the milk with orange juice for an orange glaze! I did a peach juice when peaches were in season. So yummy.

      Reply
  • Angela Maciel
    November 13, 2017 at 1:31 pm

    Hey Lindsey i tried these donuts and believe me they so delicious

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:22 pm

      I’m so glad, Angela!

      Reply
  • Summer
    December 10, 2017 at 3:36 pm

    I just made these with my daughter and they were good! I was really worried about putting that much salt in there (a whole Tablespoon!!!). I did cut the salt out of the glaze because of that and they were good…I think they would be too salty with the salt in the glaze (I added 2 TB melted butter to the glaze too). I might even reduce the amount of salt in the dough a touch next time if we make them again, but not by much. Ours weren’t tough at all (we were careful not to over mix and followed the chilling directions). Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:06 pm

      I am so glad you found success with this donut recipe, Summer! I know the salt seems like a lot but it really just intensifies the flavors. I make these several times a week at work and people go nuts! I’ll have to try a little butter in the glaze 🙂

      Reply
  • Douglas Veley
    December 11, 2017 at 1:19 am

    Omg… Just made these. A little crumbly but sooo good. First ever making donuts. These will now be a 🏠 and party staple.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 3:39 pm

      Hi Douglas! I am so glad you loved them! I’m wondering how they became crumbly? Was the dough soft before you refrigerated it the first time?

      Reply
      • Scott Oliver
        January 25, 2018 at 8:48 pm

        OMG you are my newest hero and favorite guilty pleasure. I don’t know if I love the food more or your fun banter!! OK both. I grew up working in restaurants, then managing them, then doing my own food business, so I remember my first Mexican Restaurant and having to taste all the sauces on the line when doing opening Line Checks and them all waiting for the Gringo to burn his tongue! I got my love and affinity for spices though from that time, so even the pain points cause great growth, as does your frying challenges! Look what you just did! So good!

        Hey, I took 3 Basil leaves on my second iteration of your delicious recipe, crudely diced it and put it in the cake mix, before fridge and then frying next day, as well as some chiffonade of two more leaves, the quickly cross-diced to make a little shorter strands, and turned into the glaze. I’m telling you the herb with the recipe was a super fun and fresh twist, oh and a tsp of lemon zest in the glaze as well, with the Basil…AMAYYYYY-ZING. Thank yo for your inspiration, I wish I was your friend! Take care of course and happy baking!

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          January 27, 2018 at 9:29 am

          Hi Scott!! That is such a familiar scenario that you paint! I don’t think any industry pushes you as much physically as mentally as cooking does. I would love to hear more about your experiences. That sounds delicious! Basil and lemon would be an amazing addition! Plus fried basil is everything 🙂 Right now I have a daily donut special on the menu at the restaurant and maybe I’ll have to take inspiration from your inspiration and move in a savory direction. Happy baking!

          Reply
  • Amanda Engel
    February 20, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    How would you make this chocolate? Would you just replace some of the flour with cocoa power?

    Reply
  • Bill
    March 12, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    So… I’ve tried this recipe 3 different times… measuring all ingredients to the hundredth-gram… and EVERY TIME… the “dough” that comes out is more like cake batter than “dough”.

    I live in florida, could the humidity have something to do with it?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 20, 2018 at 2:02 pm

      Hi Bill, It is absolutely essential that you chill the dough. It is like a very thick cake batter. I make large batches at the restaurant and I pull out a large piece of plastic wrap, cover it in flour (like enough to coat the plastic), scoop out the dough with a bowl scraper onto the floured plastic, cover the top in flour, wrap it, press it flatter, then chill it until firm. It isn’t a sexy process and the dough gets on anything it touches that isn’t floured, but I promise you it works. You just have to power through it! I wouldn’t worry about using too much flour as long as you brush off excess after you cut it. The excess flour will dirty your fryer oil faster and it will affect the taste of the donuts eventually. Good luck! ps- humidity has everything to do with baking! I think generous flouring will do the trick!

      Reply
  • Audra
    March 23, 2018 at 10:01 pm

    Have you ever tried an air fryer for donuts instead of oil?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 28, 2018 at 3:41 pm

      I have not. Good luck!

      Reply
  • Blanche C Konieczka
    March 26, 2018 at 11:12 pm

    Can’t wait to try these. Have one negative comment, you converted all the measurements to cups and spoons except the milk, 100g milk or 100ML…what in heaven’s name is 100ML? Why convert everything else to cups but not the milk? Before I can try this recipe, I’ll have to google 100ML to find out how many cups and or spoons that is!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 28, 2018 at 3:36 pm

      100g does not convert nicely into cups. It is just a little over 1/3 cup. Your liquid cup measure will have marks on the other side for mL or ounces.

      Reply
  • Blanche C Konieczka
    March 26, 2018 at 11:19 pm

    This recipe sounds wonderful except for rhe measurements. Just noticed the website is American heritage cooking. Well in America we use cups and spoons not grams. So WHY is the first measurement in grams on the AMERICAN heritage cooking site? Why was the milk converted to 100ML. Where in America do they use ML instead of cups, pints or quarts? The measurements didn’t bother me (except for the 100g milk being converted into 100ML) at first because I figured it was a European site but noticed later that it’s AMERICAN so use American measurements!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 28, 2018 at 3:33 pm

      Hi Blanche, As a professional baker, I use grams because they are more accurate. If you would like to use volumetric measurements, that is your choice. If you have a liquid cup measure, it will have mL on the other side. They are in smaller increments, so, again, more accurate.

      Reply
  • Cheryl Becker
    May 23, 2018 at 9:57 am

    I made these for my family and thought “How are we going to eat all of these?” and then after they were gone in 10 minutes I made a mental note to double the batch next time. Which brings me to my next essential question.

    If a person wanted to, say, make this a blueberry old fashioned donut, would frozen/thawed blueberries be ok? Wondering if the excess liquid from the berries is a problem. How do pro-bakers pull this off?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 31, 2018 at 3:58 pm

      Hahah! I Know the feeling, Cheryl! These would be delicious as blueberry! If you use thawed blueberries they will bleed into the batter. If that doesn’t bother you, then you can definitely use that! If it does then use fresh blueberries or still frozen berries. There really is no way to avoid that little bit of sogginess next to the berries because of the added moisture, but I think most people expect that. You could use freeze dried blueberries if you want. Good luck! I think I’ll have to try some donuts with fresh berries soon!

      Reply
  • Mara
    May 26, 2018 at 5:40 am

    I made this donuts once, and I’m making them again today. They’re absolutely delicious, so thanks for the recipe!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 31, 2018 at 3:59 pm

      I’m so glad you enjoyed them Mara!

      Reply
  • […] I know a thing or two about donuts…one might say that since conquering my fear of the fryer, I’ve become a woman obsessed! My Instagram will bear […]

    Reply
  • Ella
    June 3, 2018 at 12:46 pm

    My donuts are disintegrating as soon as they hit the oil..any tips on what I may be doing wrong?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      June 4, 2018 at 2:45 pm

      Hi Ella, What does the dough feel like? Are you able to cut it? Also I recently posted a YouTube video on making these cake donuts. You can also watch it and see if there is something different about what you did.

      Reply
  • 1HotTea
    June 12, 2018 at 4:40 pm

    Thank you for this delicious recipe. I got over my fear of frying when we bought an electric fryer. They have been drastically improved since I last used one. (decades)lol Just remember to not cover it while your heating. Scorched oil not only tastes terrible, it’s the fuel that starts the fire when you lift the lid and quickly force the last requirement for a fire…oxygen. Otherwise, set the temp, double check with candy thermometer $4 at corner store) and theonly reason I use chop sticks is to prevent dents/finger marks. I love that perfect looking donut! Plus, their free and require no clean up. Happy frying my fellow donut lovers!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      June 25, 2018 at 8:40 pm

      Haha! Happy frying indeed! Good tip on the heating with the lid closed. Great point!

      Reply
  • Réal
    June 13, 2018 at 12:45 am

    I tried these since my wife often ask me to stop by the donut shop and get her a couple and she says they are even better. Thanks for the Cup & Spoon translation since that’s still what we’re used to in Canada. I did’nt have quite enough sour cream so I used a 100gr of vanilla yogourt wich turn out fine. I got over 2 dozens with this recipe, don’t understand how come and the friyng turned out as well with the instructions so I kept a dozen uncooked in the freezer(put parchemin paper in between layers) and fried those few days later and they also were very nice in texture.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      June 25, 2018 at 8:38 pm

      Good to know you can freeze them! You probably rolled them out thinner than me but I say the more the merrier!

      Reply
  • Jean
    June 29, 2018 at 11:31 am

    I made this recipe exactly as you wrote it and they were little salt bombs! I hope you don’t make them with that much salt at the restaurant!! First your conversion of the salt is wrong. 12g is about 2 1/2 teaspoons not a tablespoon. Even that is s but high but might enhance the flavor as you stated, but a whole tablespoon is CRAZY!! Are you tastebuds dulled? A smoker maybe? I saw you in Chopped and your dish was too sweet there…talk to a doctor…looking for a new recipe and a new blog to follow. Not imoressed with your content here, OR you in tv…

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      July 1, 2018 at 10:16 am

      Hi Jean, your comment is very rude. Be sure you use KOSHER salt. The grain is coarser and thus won’t fit as much in a tablespoon. Yes, I use this exact recipe for some of the donuts I make in restaurant and zero people have complained, in fact quite the opposite. Your conversion of the salt tells me that you used table salt which would make this incredibly salty because the granules are finer.

      As for Chopped, you try making a dish with 40 cameras in front of you out of 4 random ingredients, half of which are sweet, in 20 minutes and you let me know how that goes.

      Reply
    • Momma
      January 18, 2019 at 10:57 pm

      A lot of mean ugly people in the world. Thanks for your fabulous recipe! And the time you have. Much appreciated.

      Reply
  • Jean
    July 1, 2018 at 12:53 pm

    You can delete my comments if you like. No skin off my back…but in response…Several people in this thread complained about the salt. And I’m the only one who’s wrong??? I used KOSHER salt, just probably picked ‘salt’ on the conversion table.

    Furthermore, as for chopped, it wasn’t your food that I was so unimpressed with. I don’t even remember what you made, just that it was too sweet. What I was unimpressed with was you personally! You have a very arrogant personality, saying how awesome you are and several other arrogant comments. You proved it again here. Telling me what an idiot I am and how you’re absolutely right because you know it all. No, your words don’t say that but your attitude behind them does. I wish you all the best, but as I said I’m moving on because there’s nothing to be impressed with here…

    And, my comment is a bit snarky, but you and your “holier than though’’ attitude is what’s rude. You think you’re too good for everyone, especially your readers and too ‘awesome’ to be questioned by them…if you’re going to write a blog that has readers, learn to take some flack!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      July 1, 2018 at 2:46 pm

      Unlike some other blogs I only delete comments if they include profanity because I believe in free speech which says more about the person who wrote it and less about the subject. I have been writing the blog for eight years so I know a little bit about taking negative comments in a stride. If you actually bothered to follow my blog or read any other posts and their comments you would know that I have adjusted recipe errors that readers have caught. I know my salt scaling is right because I bake professionally every single day. It’s not arrogance it is hard won knowledge. Some other peoples comments about salt are in the glaze, which is fair. I like to balance the sweetness of 10x with salt. It is my preference. I have no such holier than thou attitude neither here nor on the show. Perhaps you have confused me with another contestant. If you recall I was the first to say that I felt I might be going home and was worried about the judges comments.

      As for this space, I try to offer answers to people comments, questions and concerns regardless of how right they feel they are or how they choose to address me. If you want to read some negative comments and people getting angry because their own knowledge or opinions differ from mine, you should read this post’s comments. I’m still here because I want to share with people and help people see that nothing is out of their grasp in their home kitchen. You don’t know me.

      Reply
      • Bill Oberacker
        July 1, 2018 at 3:01 pm

        Why are you continuing to reply to this troll’s comments? Obviously “Jean” could never do what you do, let alone be asked to be on Chopped. Faceless, anonymous comments trying to bring others down; that’s what’s wrong with comment/message boards.

        You continue to do you and help people with your insights and thoughtfulness.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          July 3, 2018 at 5:07 pm

          Thank you Bill! I know you’re right and I appreciate you chiming in 🙂

          Reply
  • […] event the simple recipes we’ve shown you so far, here’s another delicious alternative from American Heritage Cooking that will transport you right back to happy childhood moments with each and every bite! Check out […]

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  • Easy And Delicious DIY Donut Recipes
    September 7, 2018 at 8:15 am

    […] American Heritage Cooking […]

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  • Madelyn
    September 23, 2018 at 1:09 am

    I tried this recipe yesterday. They looked amazing and I was so excited to eat them, but the only flavor we could taste was canola oil. I’m sure this is my fault. The changes I did to the recipe were – I used light sour cream since that’s all I had at the time. I had the temp between 350-360 and the donuts weren’t brown at all using your timing. So I kept them frying longer. I set them on a wire rack for 20 seconds and then glazed them like you instructed. Do you think it was the extra time in the fryer that ruined the donuts? Should I have used a different type of oil?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 4, 2018 at 5:25 pm

      Hi Madelyn, I’m so sad for you (and your donuts). I am sure the light sour cream was a perfectly fine substitute and that was certainly not the problem. It does sound like your temperature and fry times were the problem. If your oil is too hot then the outside will burn and the inside will be raw, but if you oil is too cold then the donut will absorb too much oil before it is cooked through and you will get an oily donut. If you do a tester donut and it isn’t cooking in the right time, turn up your temp. I fry in canola oil both at home and at the restaurant, so that’s not the problem. I also assume your oil was clean, because dirty oil will also impart a flavor. You might also look to your candy/fry thermometer as the culprit. If the red line is broken at any point then it is sadly worthless. You can test it in boiling water and see if it reads 212F. At the restaurant I have a fryer that holds temp and I set it at 355F and its good. Your instincts were spot on!

      Reply
  • J. D
    October 10, 2018 at 11:49 am

    this is the United States of America…Not UK! Teaspoons, tablespoons and cups!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 14, 2018 at 7:18 pm

      There is both! Weight is more accurate 🙂

      Reply
      • Becky
        January 7, 2019 at 11:19 am

        Hello!

        I have been trying to achieve the “cracked” look and have not have success. do I need to cut slots after cutting them out and before putting them in the friedge? Help please!!

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          January 7, 2019 at 11:50 am

          Hi Becky, The cracks happen naturally when they fry. Generally they are more cracked on the side that is initially down in the oil. If you overwork the dough, they won’t crack as much. Each one cracks differently and to a different degree. Check your oil temperature and make sure it isn’t too cold. IF the donut is cold and the oil is right around 350, they will crack. Unless maybe your baking powder is old and not reactive? Are they puffing at all? Best, Lindsey

          Reply
  • Becky
    January 7, 2019 at 2:35 pm

    They do puff… But I didn’t put them in the fridge after cutting.. could that be the culprit? They were likely closer to room temp.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      January 7, 2019 at 3:13 pm

      Hooray! And now we’ve found the issue. Yes, they need to be cold! After cutting, put them back in the fridge for at least 30 minutes and then you will get nice cracked donuts. If you are frying in batches, put the donuts waiting to be fried back in the fridge while you fry and dip the others. Happy frying!

      Reply
  • Becky
    January 7, 2019 at 3:15 pm

    Thank you!!! One last question.. can I sub buttermilk for the sour cream?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      January 7, 2019 at 4:50 pm

      not 1 : 1 because buttermilk is more liquid and hydrates differently plus has a different fat content. You could try to add it gradually until you get the same consistency of dough but I feel thats asking for trouble. I’ve substituted other liquids for a portion of the sour cream or I have used creme fraiche when I ran out of sour cream but never just buttermilk. Good luck!

      Reply
  • Bill O
    March 4, 2019 at 8:16 am

    So… I followed the recipe to the gram… and I even left it in the fridge overnight…

    I floured the HECK out of my counter, my pin… they rolled out nicely… then I floured the cutter… but, when I went to get the cut out shape off the counter (and my ring) it was a gooey mess…

    This is the second time this has happened… I’m honestly at my wits end… this time I ended up kneading in (what seemed like a ton) more flour… and they just didn’t cook correctly… but, i was able to cut them…

    The only thing that I can think of is that I live in Florida where it’s super humid… but, i’m in A/C… and it’s only about 50% humidity in the house…

    Do you have any advice?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 30, 2019 at 10:11 am

      Hey Bill, I make large batches of these donuts several times a week. The dough is sticky. That is so that it produces a light, cakey donut when fried. Thats why when you kneaded in more flour your final product wasnt tasty: you activated the gluten by kneading (making it tougher and more chewy and less cakey) and added more flour (making it more dense and less flavorful). You just have to use more flour to roll, and if some gets stuck to your cutter, pull it off and flour it again. Sticky doesn’t mean bad. It just means sticky!

      Reply
      • Bill O
        March 30, 2019 at 10:16 am

        Hi Lindsey… yeah… I should have replied… I made a second batch and forded through the “sticky”… I also forgot to cover them in the fridge… which apparently does something bad… but, they turned out beautiful!!!

        Thanks so much.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          March 30, 2019 at 10:19 am

          No problem! I’m glad you found success! Just like with a lot of things in pastry, you just have to power through!
          Of all the pastry sins, not covering your doughnut dough isn’t very high on the list! 🙂

          Reply
  • […] 7. Old Fashioned Sour Cream Doughnuts […]

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  • […] And more doughnuts! >> Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts […]

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  • The Weekend Dish: 8/10/2019 – Dotty Fun
    August 10, 2019 at 3:39 pm

    […] And more doughnuts! >> Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts […]

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  • Das Wochenendgericht: 8/10/2019 – My Blog
    August 15, 2019 at 1:24 am

    […] Und noch mehr Donuts! >> Altmodische Sauerrahm-Kuchen-Schaumgummiringe […]

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  • […] Visit American Heritage Cooking to read the full post. […]

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  • Janet
    October 24, 2019 at 2:17 pm

    Terrible! Too greasy and most of them fell apart in oil. After waiting sooo long with all of the chilling of the dough, then to have them taste horrible was just sad.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      November 21, 2019 at 11:09 am

      I’m sorry they didn’t work for you, Janet. I find that hard to believe given I make large batches of these at the restaurant. If they were greasy it is because the oil temperature was too low.

      Reply
  • Baked Chai Donuts
    December 10, 2019 at 9:11 pm

    […] Raspberry Glaze – Thoroughly Nourished Life Maple Glazed Donut Holes – Hall Nesting Old Fashioned Sour Cream Cake Donuts – American Heritage Cooking Paleo Chocolate Frosted Donuts – A Clean Bake Raspberry Jam Filled Cupcakes – gotta get […]

    Reply
  • Kelley
    January 9, 2020 at 6:03 pm

    Hi! So, I just spent way more time than I ever anticipated reading a blog by reading everything on this page about old fashioned donuts plus all the comments for extra tips. I’m no professional, but for years I have been really interested in learning baking techniques, improving my own skills, and understanding the science behind baking (it’s fascinating). That said, I don’t usually read through blog posts about recipes. Most of the time I just want to get to the dang recipe. I’m a busy person! I have all the important things to do – no time for reading! And, clearly, I also never read comments for more info and certainly have never left a comment myself. Obviously, that’s until now.
    Your post here is everything that a recipe blog should be. So, I really just wanted to give you some props for that, since I think everyone needs a “job well done” message every now an then. Your tips and tricks, detailed instructions, and the short but humorous back story were so enjoyable and I think really provide substance in a way that empowers your readers. So, well done. (Also, props to you for gracefully handling comments and providing even more tips and suggestions.) I haven’t tried making these yet, but I feel 100% more prepared than I did when I Googled “old fashioned sour cream donut recipe”.
    BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEASUREMENTS IN CUPS AND TEASPOONS?!?!?
    Kidding. 😉 Kitchen scale all the way.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      January 27, 2020 at 12:57 pm

      Haha! Thank you for making my day Kelley! I appreciate your comment and I am so glad you found the post and comments helpful! I hope you do make them some day! They are easier than they sound but they do take a bit of time (kind of like reading my long posts! haha) But so worth it! Plus once you make them once, you’ll never be satisfied by store bought! Keep me posted! Happy frying

      Reply
      • Kelley
        January 27, 2020 at 1:07 pm

        I did it! I made them exactly according your recipe and holy-wordsIcannotsayhere they are amazing. My brother-in-law promptly begged me to make an absurd quantity of them for him the very next weekend. Totally keeping this recipe. Thanks again.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          February 10, 2020 at 5:50 pm

          That Makes me so happy to hear!!!

          Reply
  • […] 7. Old Fashioned Sour Cream Doughnuts […]

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  • ace
    April 3, 2020 at 12:52 pm

    WOW these are amazing! I had to sub full fat plain yogurt for the sour cream because the quarantine means I can only use what’s in the fridge (nothing like the limits you had to deal with on Chopped!). Even with that sub they’re so, so good. I’m sorry you’ve had to deal with trolls who have Dunning-Kruger syndrome. I’m stunned at your generosity and patience for attempting to educate them, but some people are just bitter and like to complain. The texture and flavor profile of these donuts are PERFECT. Anyone who had trouble with them should look to their ingredients (are they fresh?) or their environment for the culprit.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      April 5, 2020 at 12:15 pm

      Aww thanks Ace! I appreciate you stopping by to comment and I am super excited to know that the recipe works with full fat yogurt! It almost makes it feel healthy, right?! lol Did you use greek yogurt?
      I feel you on the quarantine ingredient challenge! Stay safe and healthy and keep baking! It might be bad for the waistline, but it’s so good for the soul.

      Reply
  • Julie Anna Morman
    April 9, 2020 at 2:21 pm

    I am so ready to try these! They look amazing! I miss donuts….where I live there are no shops or bakeries that make them. I do have a question before I start though….the eggs. Is it okay to use the whole egg? I’m thinking not, but I’m just not sure.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      April 9, 2020 at 2:40 pm

      Hi! A world without donuts!?! Oh sad! The good news is that you won’t even miss those shops once you try mine. Promise! You do need to just use the yolks for this recipe. If you use the whites then it will add additional moisture and you will end up with a very sticky dough! Just reserve the whites for a pavlova or meringue or italian meringue buttercream or a healthy omelette! Happy frying! I have a tutorial on youtube for a similar donut if you want to watch it!

      Reply
      • Julie
        April 9, 2020 at 3:22 pm

        I thought as much…the additional liquid could cause a problem. I’ve watched several of your videos…you have been quite helpful! Thank you for the reply…I’ll let you know how they turn out! I can’t wait….this is my favorite donut.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          April 9, 2020 at 4:28 pm

          No problem! Enjoy!

          Reply
  • […] simple recipes we’ve shown you so far, here’s another delicious alternative from American Heritage Cooking that will transport you right back to happy childhood moments with each and every bite! Check […]

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  • Amanda
    May 17, 2020 at 6:52 pm

    OMGGGGGG!!!!! They were so good and so easy and you were so right about the salt in the glaze. At first I was like “ehhh” about the glaze and then I added more salt and then KABOOM! Best donuts ever. This was my first time making donuts and your instructions were really helpful. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 20, 2020 at 10:48 am

      Thanks Amanda!!! I am so glad you enjoyed!! Salt is a game changer! Especially when copious amounts of powdered sugar are involved

      Reply
  • Lisa
    July 3, 2020 at 10:24 pm

    Hi! I’m wanting to make these and am out of sour cream at the moment. Do you think I could sub Greek yogurt? Thanks for what looks like an awesome recipe!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      July 5, 2020 at 11:03 am

      Absolutely! I have never tried it but another reader did and said it was excellent!

      Reply
  • Maryam JB
    July 25, 2020 at 1:17 pm

    Hello Lindsay!
    Tried your recipe today and it’s absolutely fantastic! Totally satisfied my ‘krispy kreme vanilla cake donut’ craving which i’ve been having since forever!
    The ingredients were easy to find and the recipe was easy to follow, and the taste is amaaahazing.
    For people who asked about using egg replacer, I used Red Mill Egg replacer (followed their instructions for egg yolks) and it worked wonderfully. Just be sure mix and add each egg yolk separately to the sugar and butter while mixing. (I used a separate small bowl for each replaced egg yolk).

    Many thanks again! Looking forward to trying more of your recipes. :))

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      July 28, 2020 at 8:27 am

      Hi Maryam! Thank you so much for taking the time to stop back and comment. I am so happy you enjoyed the donuts! I am super curious about this egg replacer! Thank you for adding that so others could learn from your trials! I hope you try many other recipes! Happy baking (and frying)!

      Reply

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